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7 responses

  1. Kelsey
    12/04

    Wow. That classroom looks incredible. Mine were all bare concrete walls and chalkboards!

    • Christine Ka’aloa
      12/06

      @Kelsey: Yeah, even our classroom doesn’t look as nice. Though we have just a bit more than you. 😉

  2. Laura in Cancun
    12/01

    Sounds very cool! I love the dynamic activities!

    Throughout middle and high school in Virginia, we had different class levels as well. It worked out very well, allowing each kid to perform to their specific ability in each subject.

  3. Chance Alberg
    12/01

    I just found out that my school was a ‘former’ model school and is attempting to become one again, hence the heavy work load and frequent observations! We also employ many of the same resources that you have mentioned and I think it makes the classes a little more engaging for the kids. Using pictures of the kids or video of hte kids rather them Minsu certainly garners a lot more attention.

    What are your thoughts on the observation? Did you think it was effective lesson plan and something that most schools could do?

    • Christine Ka’aloa
      12/01

      @julia: I totally have respect for you and the fact you have to lesson plan on your own. Man, that is not an easy task and you must feel so much pressure to keep up w/ your school’s expectations.
      @Laura: Yeah, actually I do remember my old elem. school having a similar way of differentiating levels but I can’t remember how they did it. I think they just had separate classes in some cases. We did have a slow and advanced group for some subjects like math or reading.

      @Chance: As I said, it was a special type of program that the government funded as I think a kind of test to see if it would work, so it wasn’t like the normal kind of observations we get… although you prob get more than we do. I recognized some of the techniques from having done our NET observation group/classes, so I understood the tricks that were being used and the fact the teachers have chosen their best classes.

      Do I think it was effective? Yes & No.

      Level-differentiation is definitely more effective. But the planning for the observation seemed a little much; I realize part of it was “show value”. Most of their materials were “custom/hand made” for these lessons; it’s highly unrealistic for an average teacher to spend that kind of time or effort on a game which has the lifetime of “one” class. There’s an easier and equally efficient way to create these kinds of games, I believe.

      And rather than having 3 different levels mixed in one class they should just level-differentiate by class, as I was telling @Laura. Would make the lesson planning and classroom management so much easier.

      A model school, I’d see as the equivalent of an American private school. The students and teachers there would take on a more serious and professional demeanor, the way my high school did. But overall, the observation was impressive. I think my co-teacher and I walked away feeling like our teacher-ness was hurting. I know I felt it and I really strain my brain for some of my lesson planning!

    • Christine Ka’aloa
      12/01

      @julia: I totally have respect for you and the fact you have to lesson plan on your own. Man, that is not an easy task and you must feel so much pressure to keep up w/ your school’s expectations.

      @Laura: Yeah, actually I do remember my old elem. school having a similar way of differentiating levels but I can’t remember how they did it. I think they just had separate classes in some cases. We did have a slow and advanced group for some subjects like math or reading.

      @Chance: As I said, it was a special type of program that the government funded as I think a kind of test to see if it would work, so it wasn’t like the normal kind of observations we get… although you prob get more than we do. I recognized some of the techniques from having done our NET observation group/classes, so I understood the tricks that were being used and the fact the teachers have chosen their best classes.

      Do I think it was effective? Yes & No.

      Level-differentiation is definitely more effective. But the planning for the observation seemed a little much; I realize part of it was “show value”. Most of their materials were “custom/hand made” for these lessons; it’s highly unrealistic for an average teacher to spend that kind of time or effort on a game which has the lifetime of “one” class. There’s an easier and equally efficient way to create these kinds of games, I believe.

      And rather than having 3 different levels mixed in one class they should just level-differentiate by class, as I was telling @Laura. Would make the lesson planning and classroom management so much easier.

      A model school, I’d see as the equivalent of an American private school. The students and teachers there would take on a more serious and professional demeanor, the way my high school did. But overall, the observation was impressive. I think my co-teacher and I walked away feeling like our teacher-ness was hurting. I know I felt it and I really strain my brain for some of my lesson planning!

  4. julia
    11/30

    actually, my school is supposedly a model school, but since we’re a middle school and have nowhere near the budget for those kinds of materials, it’s more limited… i do get to teach leveled classes, however. and my big open class is next week!

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