Pin It

23 responses

  1. L.I.F.E
    07/24

    Love this article. Great tips! I remember watching one of your videos when you were talking about safety and mentioned always holding a pen… then I noticed a pen in your picture in this post 😀

    Reply

  2. H-A-B
    06/04

    Personal safety and self-defense is so important for us women travelers and we should all be prepared to fight back effectively and know the best techniques to use if the need ever arises.

    I have been teaching Krav Maga to women and girls for over 5 years now and we teach a very effective technique which should be in every woman and girls arsenal. We are a women only event, run by women, for women, and this is what we teach to women of all ages.

    This is the “groin grab” self-defense technique to be used against a male attacker which is taught in many womens self-defense classes, and there is actually a little trick to it…

    You’re going to take your hand and grasp between the attackers thighs underhand. Its going to feel like you’re “cradling” the testicles. Dig your fingertips into the fragile skin BEHIND the scrotum. Then, once you have a good grip, you turn your hand into a vice, with your fingers digging inwards, around the back and over the top of the testicles. If you do it right, you should feel the testes INSIDE your hand which is holding the scrotum. You want, whenever possible, to hook your fingers over and around at least one testicle. One of them is enough.

    Then, with your hands in a claw and your fingertips latched around the testes, you turn your hand sharply, as though you were turning a doorknob. Simultaneously, squeeze hard and pull the testicles away from his body as fast and as hard as you can. Do not let go of them, but continue to squeeze them with all of your strength. This is important. What happens then, is that your assailant usually screams out in pain and then tries to grab the wrist of your hand holding him in a futile attempt to try to get you to release him. Don’t. He then quickly loses one of the natural advantages he usually has over us (his strength) within a matter of seconds. Vomiting, curling over, collapsing and convulsing is common. Shock and unconsciousness can set in within 8 seconds. When he collapses, which he will, you get away to safety as quickly as possible and call for help.

    It’s never too late to perform this technique at any stage of an attack, and that even includes the option of reaching down if he’s on top of you, but it is easiest to do when the testicles are exposed and closest to you where you can grab hold of them. I’ve actually met several women in my life who have fought off their attackers in this way and one did it when her attacker was on top of her and raping her at the point he lost control. Don’t ever hold back. Some women scream while they are doing this, and some women think of a loved one being harmed to help overcome any bad feelings of hurting someone else even if they are being hurt themselves. Do whatever you have to do if you feel it helps.

    If done properly, and done with enough force, this technique can even lead to the testicles rupturing. It’s actually easier to do than most women believe, and just about all of us have the capability to injure an attackers testicles in this way – whether we are young girls still of school age, or whether we are great grandmothers. After all, if you think about it testicles are just small objects of extreme vulnerability to pain squishiness wrapped in a delicate layer of skin which offers them no protection at all from this kind of counterattack. Most importantly, this fact holds true no matter what size your attacker is, nor how strong he is. And no matter how angry he is, and how much he’s threatened what he’s going to do to you, he’s going to drop. Don’t let anyone (usually men) try to convince you otherwise.

    I know that this advice would have been a difficult read for many women, but our lives are worth far more than a rapists testicles and we should be prepared to do whatever it takes to get away to safety. Please help to share this advice with as many other women and girls in any way you can. It could one day be a life saver.

    Reply

  3. LK
    07/30

    Would love to see the followup: “Is solo travel still safe for men?”

    Reply

    • Christine Ka’aloa
      07/30

      @LK: Yes, good idea! I think it’s easy to assume it’s safer for men, because men are known to be adventurous and capable. But I think that also gets them into a lot more trouble than women, because we are the more safety-oriented species. Boys dare more, but they also get into trouble more. 😉

      Reply

  4. Arianwen
    06/04

    Gut feelings have got me by in most places. Usually when I didn’t feel comfortable it was for good reason. I also agree that safety when travelling solo shouldn’t just be a woman’s problem. When I heard about problems encountered by other travellers in South America, there were just as many men as women. I tool self-defense classes for 10 years when I was younger and I definitely think it helps give you more confidence to go it alone…even if I’ve long forgotten how to release from a grab or land a flying side kick to the face!

    Reply

  5. @TravPartner
    04/20

    Is Solo Travel Still Safe for Women? …6 Safety Tips that make it so http://t.co/yg7CmKgCVU

    Reply

  6. Nicole @ Suitcase Stories
    04/17

    Great post Christine! Im not actually a solo traveler, I travel with my husband, but these points still relate to us. Its so important to be aware of your surroundings at all times. And like you said, if your internal alarm is sounding off, don’t ignore it!

    The world is actually much safer than the media makes it out to be. In fact, the only time I have ever felt unsafe was in the States. Ive never felt unsafe in Central or South America but we also use common sense!

    It would be a shame if women let fear stop them from traveling solo when really all the need is common sense and they will be just as safe, or safer, than in their own country!

    Reply

    • Christine Ka’aloa
      04/17

      @Nicole: Thanks. Your feminine input is very welcome, solo or not. And thanks for the U.S. validation. Not that I’d like to rag on my own country but I’m more afraid and careful jogging at night in my neighborhood in Hawaii than I am traveling. Although South America I’ve not been to yet… I’ve heard different things about it, so I’ll need to gather my girl balls for that one.

      Reply

  7. claire
    03/08

    hi christine! thank you for the safety tips. I make a reference to your post on this for my countdown of my 10-day-solo-travel-to-south-korea next week. your blog on jeju is a great help for me as i planned my itinerary. keep it up! 🙂

    Reply

  8. Shalu Sharma
    02/18

    Good tips on travelling solo for women. The more I read the more I learn. There is nothing called reading as much as you can from your fellow travellers about travelling alone for women. Its breaks my heart that we women have to go through this while men are simply able to backpack around without issues. I like the idea of being bold and confidence, it can mean a lot for your own self esteem and those who want to harm you. Well done for these tips.

    Reply

    • Christine Ka’aloa
      02/20

      @Shalu: Well, it appears that men have it easier and I think that too. But women are more cautious, so there’s more of a likelihood they’ll avoid trouble, whereas men are quite opposite. Sometimes, I feel like there’s more crimes against men outside their home and more crimes to women, inside their home. If we women had just a little more bold attributes, we might be perfect. 😉

      Reply

  9. Penny Sadler
    02/09

    Great tips and I’d like to think most are common sense? However, I’ve also noticed that many women dress in ways that could and do, invite undesirable attention. Thank you for mentioning this and the motivations behind it. I won’t go into it here, but I’ve had my share of dangerous experiences, almost ALL of them in Texas, where I live. I’d also like to add, do not drink too much or in any other way impair your senses or cloud your intuition.

    Reply

    • Christine Ka’aloa
      02/09

      @Penny: Hope you don’t live in Houston cause that city is in the top 10 for highest crime rate in the U.S. But excellent tip for both, guys and girls! Maybe throw in there a tip on ‘watching your drink’ so that no one slips anything in it. Thanks for your advice =)

      Reply

  10. Aleah | SolitaryWanderer.com
    02/08

    I am never without a backpack as well, and I agree that wearing it on the front is so much better. I have so much stuff when I travel, from my camera and notebooks, to my umbrella and a bottle of water. This is an excellent post for the #WeGoSolo movement, Christine! Thanks for linking to my safety post, it’s time to write a new one 😀

    Reply

    • Christine Ka’aloa
      02/09

      @Aleah: Yay, another backpack user. We probably look like college students. Thanks for the your post as well. You have some good tips and inspiring examples!

      Reply

  11. Katie
    02/08

    I love this article and tips except for one – wearing a backpack on the front. I would simply recommend trying to avoid carrying a backpack/daypack whenever possible – sure, wearing it on your front allows you to keep an eye on it better, but it also screams “I am a tourist.” Even if you have dressed to blend in with the locals and speak the language, wearing a backpack on your front is something only tourists do and I believe it makes you a target. With the exception of a couple day hikes when I needed to carry food & water (and was with a guide in the middle of the mountains far away from thieves), I never carried a daypack – always an over-the-shoulder bag with a thick strap that could easily hold everything I needed for a day out exploring.

    Reply

    • Christine Ka’aloa
      02/08

      @Katie: That is excellent advice. Although for me, I have to carry a backpack– I have a DSLR with different lenses in it and it’s heavy. Sometimes, I’m even packing my laptop. I kinda break that big rule about not having valuables on me… and often protecting my tech equipment feels more important than my life (gulp). I think TV camera operators in general feel like that. ha ha.. But otherwise, correct. A backpack can totally scream tourist. Your tip is well founded.

      Reply

Leave a Reply. Holler up and share your thoughts!

Back to top
mobile desktop