Trekking in Nepal: Nagarkot to Sankhu Village (Day 2)

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Early morning trek

Trekking in Nepal


Day #2: (continued)

Bacchu wakes me up so I can see the sun rise.

5AM. It’s not easy for me to get out of bed, but I’m certain it’ll be worth it.  I am not normally a  “Sunrise” type of person, but it certainly was gorgeous one and I’m glad he woke me up for it. We ate some


breakfast  and then we were off!

sunrise in nepal

sunrise in nepal

nagarkot sunrise

Sunrise from my hotel

Trekking in Nepal

Walking through villages in the early morning has a wonderfully tranquil feel to it. The view is shrouded in mist and fog to make its mountain valley presence even more-so mystical. Animals are awake as farming life begins to stirand nature begins to chirp.

By around 7am, farming activity takes shape. Villagers carry baskets and farm in their lovely sculpted fields of rice and grain. Life can be hard for the farming community out, but life must have some rewards. I imagine their labors softened by the beauty of waking up to their own lush surroundings. I have never seen anything like it! These mountains are the most… “breath-taking” by far.

bachhu early morning

bachhu early morning

Early morning trek

Early morning trek

trekking Nepal

trekking Nepal

mountain animals

mountain animals

trekking in Nepal

trekking in Nepal

farm

children in Nepal

children in Nepal

Mountain children and schooling in Nepal

The children here seem happy everywhere you look. But it’s not easy being a kid in Nepal…

In the mountain villages, life doesn’t seem any easier. Mountain children get up early to help their families farm. Because mountain families are often poor, few of their children get the privilege of going to school. School costs money and often you must afford a uniform. If the families can afford to do both, the children must walk miles to get to school, which is in the village town.

Child workers in Nepal

Child workers in Nepal

Child workers in Nepal

Children work early in the morning carrying things from the farm in bags strapped to their heads.

mountain child workers

mountain child workers   mountain child workers

 

sankhu school girls

sankhu school girls

What ethnicity is Nepali?

The faces here receive influences from neighboring countries of China and India. Beautifully exotic, facial features here appear either an “Asian soft-and-round” due to a strain of Mongolian or exacting due to the Indian population. Overall however, the Nepalese consider themselves neither/nor. They consider themselves “Nepali”.

‘Yes’ is the main religion

If you ask a Nepalese person if they are  Buddhist or Hindu, their response will be “Yes”.

The major religions and the celebration of religious festivals are a cross-pollination of both. While Nepal may not have the same name for its festival as Hindus in India, the celebrations honor the same (ie. Dusain Festival in Nepal and Dussehra in India; both, honor Durga Puja).

How do you tell which house honors which religion?

Passing through villages, I see doorways marked with decorations. They announce what kind of house religion it is. Hindu houses can have a spattered tikkas above their doorway followed with a picture of a Hindu god. Meanwhile, Buddhists tend to have ornate markings of Bodhisattva eyes or Buddhas.

While there are slight distinctions as such to let you know what religion a family may belong to, the inter-marriage between the two religions knows no segregation. A Buddhist may marry a Hindu and religious affiliation is less a concern than caste..

buddhist house markings in Nepal

Buddhist house markings in Nepal

HIndu house markings in Nepal

HIndu house markings in Nepal

.

Brotherhood Chai

Along the way, we come across some locals traveling upon the road. The local (stranger) and Bacchu will strike up a long and passionate conversation in Nepalese, walking together as if they have known each other for ages (which is good as it allows me to stop every once a while to take pictures and then run to catch up with them and act as if I never left).

Friend?” I ask Bacchu.

He answers that he did not know that person. They just met.

I guess that is Nepali friendliness!

.

brotherhood chai

brotherhood chai: Bacchu makes conversation with strangers along the way.

washing clothes

Women wash clothes in a public basin

Shop girl in Nepal

Shop girl in Nepal

Finally, we reach Sankhu Village and I’ve reached the end of my trek. Time for Bacchu and I to catch the bus back to Thamel.

Trekking tours are definitely one of the best ways to explore the countryside and farmlands and for all of $60, I’m extremely pleased with all that I’ve seen in beautifully-patterned rice fields, streams, sunrises, early morning mystic mountains and a farming community their a friendly but relentless worker spirit. The next time I’m here, I would love to take a longer trek to explore more of these mountain village/farming regions. It’s been an exhilarating, eye-opening and heart-warming experience for me.

This is a memory I will keep with me for times to come!

Nepalese bus

On the Nepalese bus back to Thamel

Travel Essentials to Shop for Nepal

Recommended Essentials for Nepal.  Click to Shop.

 

 To contact my awesome guide, Bacchu, directly for a personal or group trek. Or email me.

Bacchuram Tamang ( bacchu)
email: [email protected]
cell # +977 9803 327937
Kathmandu,  Nepal

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